2017 Randall B. Griepp Visiting Professor - Lars G. Svensson, MD, PhD

Named in honor of Randall B. Griepp, MD, Emeritus Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at The Mount Sinai Hospital, where he served as Professor and Chairman of the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery from 1985 to 2001. The Randall B. Griepp Visiting Professor is a chosen physician leader in the field of aortic disease and education.

TAVR, AVR Surgery and Root Repair

Presented by Lars G. Svensson, MD, PhD

Chairman, Sydell and Arnold Miller Family
Heart and Vascular Institute
Delos M. Cosgrove, MD, Chair for Heart Disease Research
Professor of Surgery, Thoracic & Cardiovascular Surgery, Cleveland Clinic

 

About Dr. Svensson

Lars Georg Svensson, MD, PhD, is Chairman of the Sydell and Arnold Miller Family Heart and Vascular Institute as well as Staff Surgeon in the Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery at Cleveland Clinic. He is also Professor of Surgery at Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University.

Dr. Svensson is board-certified in general, vascular, thoracic and cardiac surgery. He specializes in aortic valve surgery, aortic valve and bicuspid valve repair, cardiac surgery, complex aortic aneurysm, endovascular aorta treatment, heart surgery of patients with Marfan syndrome, modified David’s reimplantation procedure, percutaneous treatment of patients with valve disease, minimally invasive heart surgery, Marfan syndrome and connective tissue disorders.

He obtained his medical degree in 1978, a MSc in 1983 and a PhD in 1986 from the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. His Cardiology, General and Vascular Surgery training was at the Johannesburg Hospital, followed by Cardiovascular Surgery training at the Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland, Ohio), and Baylor College of Medicine (Houston, TX) including Cardiothoracic Surgery residency. He was Chief of Cardiovascular Surgery at Houston Veterans Affairs Medical Center and worked with Drs. DeBakey and Crawford at Baylor College of Medicine. He was Assistant Professor of Surgery at Baylor College of Medicine, and then Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Tufts University, and Instructor at Harvard Medical School while working at the Lahey Hospital and Medical Center in Boston. In 2005 he was made King James IV Professor of Surgery of The Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, Scotland.

Dr. Svensson is on numerous committees, including the Society of Thoracic Surgery, American Association for Thoracic Surgery Government Relations Committee, Annals of Thoracic Surgery, and the Cleveland Clinic Surgery Committee. His interests are minimal invasive valve surgery, percutaneous cardiovascular surgery, and brain and spinal cord protection during cardiovascular surgery. His hobbies are photography and sailing.

About Dr. Griepp

Randall B. Griepp, MD, is the Emeritus Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at The Mount Sinai Hospital, where he served as Professor and Chairman of the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery from 1985 to 2001.

His best-known contributions to the field of cardiac surgery were heralded by a high school science project, in which 15 year old Randall Griepp designed a model to measure the metabolic rate of a goldfish at different temperatures, winning first prize in the 1956 San Francisco Science Fair.

Dr. Griepp went on to receive a Bachelor of Science degree from the California Institute of Technology, and his Doctor of Medicine degree from Stanford University Medical School. He returned to Stanford in 1968 after a medical internship at Bellevue Hospital in New York, to train in general surgery and cardiac surgery under Dr. Norman E. Shumway who had performed his first heart transplant (the 4th in the world) at Stanford 6 months earlier. Dr. Griepp performed his first heart transplant on January 1st, 1970, and went on to lead the Stanford heart transplant team during these formative years, producing outcomes and publishing research that helped to establish heart transplantation as a reliable clinical option.

While at Stanford Dr. Griepp described the benefits of topical hypothermia in myocardial protection; developed a technique for total arch replacement using deep hypothermic circulatory arrest; and also participated in the early development of mechanical assist devices. His research and clinical work continued at State University New York where he was appointed Chief and then Chairman of Cardiothoracic Surgery, and then The Mount Sinai Hospital where he joined the faculty as Chairman in 1985. His other seminal contributions to the field of cardiac surgery include identifying the optimal approaches to selective cerebral perfusion and spinal cord protection; use of trifurcation graft for arch replacement; and elucidating the national history of aortic aneurysms.

Dr. Griepp trained over 40 chief residents and fellows in cardiothoracic surgery at least 15 of whom have served as Chairman or Chiefs in cardiac surgery; and he is the founding director of the Aortic Symposium, serving from 1988 to 2012.