2016 Randall B. Griepp Visiting Professor - Duke E. Cameron, MD

Named in honor of Randall B. Griepp, MD, Emeritus Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at The Mount Sinai Hospital, where he served as Professor and Chairman of the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery from 1985 to 2001. The Randall B. Griepp Visiting Professor is a chosen physician leader in the field of aortic disease and education.

The Marfan Syndrome

Presented by Duke E. Cameron, MD

Cardiac Surgeon-In-Charge
James Dresher Senior Professor of Surgery and Professor of Pediatrics
Division of Cardiac Surgery
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
Baltimore, MD

 

About Dr. Cameron

Dr. Duke E. Cameron is the Cardiac Surgeon-In-Charge, James Dresher Senior Professor of Surgery and Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Cardiac Surgery at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Cameron is also the Director of The Dana & Albert “Cubby” Broccoli Center for Aortic Diseases. His clinical interests are pediatric cardiac surgery, valve repair, adult congenital heart disease and aortic surgery, particularly for Marfan syndrome.

A graduate of Harvard College and Yale Medical School, Dr. Cameron completed his general surgery training at Yale-New Haven Hospital and the Middlesex Hospital in London. He entered a cardiothoracic surgical fellowship at Johns Hopkins and joined the faculty of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1987. In 1993, he held a joint appointment at the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne, Australia as a locum consultant surgeon.

Dr. Cameron’s early investigative work focused on inflammatory mediators in cardio-pulmonary bypass, but more recently has shifted to clinical research in adult and pediatric cardiac surgery. His experience and personal series of valve-sparing aortic root replacements have made him a renowned speaker throughout the world on the subject of aortic surgery.

The author of over 160 peer reviewed articles, Dr. Cameron has also co-edited three books: Current Therapy in Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, The Johns Hopkins Manual of Cardiac Surgery and Critical Heart Disease in Infants and Children. He is an internationally acclaimed educator in cardiovascular surgery and is the current Vice President of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery.

About Dr. Griepp

Dr. Randall B. Griepp is the Emeritus Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Mount Sinai Hospital, where he served as Professor and Chairman of the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery from 1985 to 2001.

His best-known contributions to the field of cardiac surgery were heralded by a high-school science project, in which 15 year old Randall Griepp designed an experimental model to measure metabolic rate of a goldfish at different temperatures, winning first prize in the 1956 San Francisco Science Fair.

Dr. Griepp went on to receive a Bachelor of Science degree from the California Institute of Technology, and his Doctor of Medicine degree from Stanford University Medical School. He returned to Stanford in 1968 after a medical internship at Bellevue Hospital in New York, to train in general surgery and cardiac surgery under Dr. Norman E. Shumway who had performed his first heart transplant (the 4th in the world) at Stanford 6 months earlier. Dr. Griepp performed his first heart transplant on January 1st 1970, and went on to lead the Stanford heart transplant team during these formative years, producing outcomes and publishing research that helped to establish heart transplantation as a reliable clinical option.

While at Stanford Dr. Griepp described the benefits of topical hypothermia in myocardial protection; developed a technique for total arch replacement using deep hypothermic circulatory arrest; and also participated in the early development of mechanical assist devices. His research and clinical work continued at State University New York where he was appointed Chief and then Chairman of Cardiothoracic Surgery, and then Mount Sinai Hospital where he joined the faculty as Chairman in 1985. His other seminal contributions to the field of cardiac surgery include identifying the optimal approaches to selective cerebral perfusion and spinal cord protection; use of trifurcation graft for arch replacement; and elucidating the national history of aortic aneurysms.

Dr. Griepp trained over 40 chief residents and fellows in cardiothoracic surgery at least 15 of whom have served as Chairman or Chiefs in cardiac surgery; and he is the founding director of the Aortic Symposium, serving as director from 1988 to 2012.

Dr. Griepp met his wife Dr. Eva Botstein Griepp, a pediatric cardiologist, during his internship at Bellevue, and they went on to collaborate on his laboratory and clinical research, as well as the Aortic Symposium. Their son, Matthew Griepp, MD recently graduated medical school.